PAPER People: @punker_irl

For most of 2020, our world has been reduced to the experiences we have on our phones. And TikTokers have been leading the charge in creating viral entertainment that keeps us scrolling for hours and hours. So this year’s PAPER People shifts its focus exclusively to TikTok — the breakout app our President wanted to ban, that launched sleeper hits and massive pop careers, that ushered in an entirely new generation of influence. Meet our 20 favorites across comedy, fashion, social justice and more, who are owning their spaces and racking in millions of likes. (And follow PAPER on TikTok).

Related | PAPER People 2020: Meet 20 TikTokers We Love

Think of Syd, AKA @punker_irl, as TikTok’s Manic Panic product representative. He’s reworking the mall goth look for Gen Z and gaining millions of fans while doing it. Hit follow to watch him raise mental health awareness while recreating Just Dance routines, lip sync to everyone from Doja Cat to Lil Peep, and even single handedly save the USPS by offering a PO box for fans to send letters to and promising to write back. Sometimes in full clown makeup.

@papermagazine

Introducing our class of 2020 PAPER People exclusively on TikTok💕 We all want to be @punker_irl 🥺✨

♬ moment lildeath – yoogmi

What’s your favorite animal social media account to follow and why?

My favorite animal social media account is @Monkeys400 and the #MonkeyMonday because they make me happy.

What’s your go-to appetizer?

My favorite appetizer is Mozzarella sticks.

What’s your most overused word or phrase?

I use this made-up phrase that my friends and I used to say in middle school. Instead of saying, “On god,” we would say, “On baby.”

What is the most embarrassing thing you’ve ever done?

I think the most embarrassing thing I’ve done is sign up for TikTok.

What does your star chart say about you? (Do you agree?)

I am a Scorpio, i have a Pisces moon and my rising sign is a Capricorn, so this means I’m very moody, I wear a “mask” when meeting or talking to people, and I have a very strong urge to solve problems and get over them as fast as I can.

What was your first reaction after going viral?

When I first went viral my only two emotions were terrified and embarrassed.

What’s your favorite TikTok sound?

My favorite one is the “asdf” audio that goes like, “Ahh I’m a muffin it’s muffin time, who wants a muffin?” — very silly, very funny.

Where do you want to be when the world ends?

When the world ends, I would like to be with my friends because I wanna be with the people who make me the happiest.

What does your (UberEats, Seamless, GrubHub, etc.) order history look like?

My order history is literally just boba and s’mores blizzards from Dairy Queen.

What was the last song you listened to?

The last song I listened to was “Francis Forever” by Mitski.

Creative direction: Agusta Yr (at No Agency New York)
Styling: Erika Golcher
Styling assistant: Macauley Deverin
Environments: Aspik Tears

Kemio Launches First-Ever US Collab With Freak City

24-year-old internet superstar Kemio is a force in Japanese pop culture — his fast-paced YouTube videos, signature catchphrases, heightened fashion sense and casual “storytimes” on his experiences living in America famously capture the zeitgeist. Today, he’s expanding his international presence further through his first-ever US collaboration with Los Angeles-based streetwear label Freak City.

Related | Japanese Sensation Kemio Is Taking America

Marrying Kemio’s appreciation for high fashion with Freak City’s streetwear cache, the unisex collection leans on the late ’90s and early 2000s aesthetic with intentionally oversized clothes and playful graphic illustrations. One t-shirt features an anime caricature of Kemio with baby blue hair and another boasts a colorful butterfly design at its center, while a black hoodie shimmers with dragon motifs made from crystals.




Kemio called on his close friend and model Justine Mae Biticon to pose alongside him for the collection’s campaign. Shot in Downtown LA by Creative Director Coughs, the imagery enlivens the line’s grunge aesthetic in a graffiti-covered alley with neon lights and references old-time trends through its styling components — specifically, twisted braids and butterfly-inspired makeup.

“I’m so excited to partner with Freak City on my first US Collection,” Kemio said. “I’ve always been such a big fan of their clothing and hope that my fans will love these pieces as much as I do.”

Check out the full collection on Freak City’s website, available now.

Photos courtesy of Freak City

Hype House Members Criticized For Tekashi 6ix9ine Videos

The Hype House is under intense scrutiny after recording several TikTok videos with Tekashi 6ix9ine.

Earlier this week, founder Thomas Petrou uploaded a YouTube video in which he “surprised” fellow members of the popular collective with the controversial rapper.

Related | TikToker Tony Lopez Dropped By Bliss Over Sexual Misconduct Allegations

However, given that 6ix9ine has previously pled guilty to a child sexual performance charge, it didn’t take long for the internet to criticize several Hype House members for posting content recorded with him.

“Ofc the hype house supports 6ix9ine,” as one Twitter user wrote, while others simply commented that the situation was “Yikes.”

Yikes 🥴 pic.twitter.com/9uZ0FqKBIe

— Spill Sesh (@spillseshYT) September 8, 2020

ofc the hype house supports 6ix9ine

— caleb finn 💧 (@ccalebfinn) September 9, 2020

Meanwhile, others argued that the Hype House’s co-sign was deeply problematic because of their young fanbase and the fact that 17-year-old member Avani Gregg is underage.

“The hype house hanging out with 6ix9ine is absolutely the worst thing they could ever do most of their supporters are a young audience,” as another person wrote. “Y’all supposed to set a good example for them hanging with a child molester for clout this ain’t something to flex about you’re all disgusting.”

the hype house hanging out with 6ix9ine is absolutely the worst thing they could ever do most of their supporters are a young audience y’all supposed to set a good example for them hanging with a child molester for clout this ain’t something to flex about you’re all disgusting

— esra (@vibesesra) September 9, 2020

not the hype house inviting over 6ix9ine… aren’t there underage girls there? /s

— barbie (@jaewise) September 9, 2020

In the wake of the backlash, Pop Buzz reported that Hype House members Olivia Ponton deleted her TikTok with 6ix9ine and that a video posted to the rapper’s own page featuring Ondreaz Lopez had also been removed after the influencer wrote in a comment that, “It was a TikTok his PR team wanted on his page for his personal TikTok. We ain’t even finish the full dance it was so awkward.”

That said, Hype House member Tayler Holden has kept his video up after recently defending the collab to paparazzi by saying, “He’s actually a really nice guy. Really genuine and really down to earth.”

See what else people are saying about the videos, below.

i don’t know about you, but 6ix9ine, a known pedo, going to the hype house doesn’t sit right with me.

— ً (@laheyslayer) September 9, 2020

everyone in the hype house hanging out with 6ix9ine is is disgusting and gross. y’all have children who look up to you and you’re hanging out with a man who molested children he’s a pedophile and y’all posting this on your platform for clout…

— chrishona ♡ (@vinniesstorms) September 9, 2020

WHY THE FUCK IS 6IX9INE AT THE HYPE HOUSE BYE pic.twitter.com/1e7RrAuiU3

— amelia : inactive (@sweetenqerr) September 8, 2020

ur kidding, 6ix9ine did not go to the hypehouse wtf

— tyler funke 🙂 (@TylerFunke) September 8, 2020

i have no respect for the hype house anymore. seriously like even lil buddy wasn’t there are you kidding me. it’s not the fucking hard to not care about money for an hour or 2. they all know what 6ix9ine did and they have no excuse. it’s humiliating and gross.

— laura (@laurasuxbigtime) September 9, 2020

Photo via Getty

Stop Calling Dr. Phil ‘Daddy’

Don’t call Dr. Phil “daddy.” He, seriously, doesn’t like that. He took to TikTok recently to let his 4.4 million followers know that unless you’re an immediate descendant of his, you don’t need to be calling him a word that children normally use to describe their father.

Related | PAPER People 2020: Meet 20 TikTokers We Love

Dr. Phil’s brief warm message to fans had a stern undertone. “You have to stop calling me daddy on all my posts,” he said in the video, showing off a small smile. “I ain’t your daddy, I’d hate to break it to you.”

@drphil ##YouHaveTo stop calling me “daddy.” I ain’t ya daddy.
♬ you have to stop supporting trump – hannah_harpist

He continued on with a somewhat serious note for everyone saying, “Your real daddy is probably getting his feelings hurt. I appreciate your support. It’s a little weird, but I appreciate the support.”

Dr. Phil has become something of a father figure for countless people across TikTok as of recently. Whether it’s exploring the healthy ways to understand mental health to explaining exactly what a “simp” means, he’s been helping people to cope during the pandemic with his important messages.

Check out Dr. Phil’s response to being called “Daddy” up above.

Photo via BFA


PAPER People: @xowiejones

For most of 2020, our world has been reduced to the experiences we have on our phones. And TikTokers have been leading the charge in creating viral entertainment that keeps us scrolling for hours and hours. So this year’s PAPER People shifts its focus exclusively to TikTok — the breakout app our President wanted to ban, that launched sleeper hits and massive pop careers, that ushered in an entirely new generation of influence. Meet our 20 favorites across comedy, fashion, social justice and more, who are owning their spaces and racking in millions of likes. (And follow PAPER on TikTok).

Related | PAPER People 2020: Meet 20 TikTokers We Love

With makeup skills that could get her a job doing special effects on a slasher movie and a goth girl wardrobe to match, you can catch Xowie Jones lip syncing to gecs while rocking a vintage Korn t-shirt and creepers. The 21-year-old creator boasts an entire five million followers, all of them devoted to her cult of facial piercings and winged liner. Her videos will convince you to try red eyeshadow, but it probably won’t look as good.

@papermagazine

Introducing our class of 2020 PAPER People exclusively on TikTok✨ say hi to @xowiejones 🥰

♬ Luka luka version – tsushihara

What’s your go-to appetizer?

Boneless buffalo wings 🙂

Describe the most recent photo or video on your phone.

A video of my pet rats cleaning themselves.

Which TV shows are helping you survive 2020 and why?

Lucifer! I watch it every night.

What’s your most overused word or phrase?

I use the B) emoji a lot.

If you could have a superpower what would it be and why?

Invisibility because sometimes I just wanna peace out.

Where do you want to be when the world ends?

Going down with it.

Who’s your TikTok crush and why?

@benkro_tv because he’s my boyfriend. Gotta lock ’em down while you can.

What does your (UberEats, Seamless, GrubHub etc) order history look like?

So much Taco Bell.

What was your last text?

“u hungry?” That was to my roommate.

What was the last song you listened to?

“More Human Than Human” by White Zombie.

Creative direction: Agusta Yr (at No Agency New York)
Styling: Erika Golcher
Styling assistant: Macauley Deverin
Environments: Aspik Tears

PAPER People: @snarkymarky

For most of 2020, our world has been reduced to the experiences we have on our phones. And TikTokers have been leading the charge in creating viral entertainment that keeps us scrolling for hours and hours. So this year’s PAPER People shifts its focus exclusively to TikTok — the breakout app our President wanted to ban, that launched sleeper hits and massive pop careers, that ushered in an entirely new generation of influence. Meet our 20 favorites across comedy, fashion, social justice and more, who are owning their spaces and racking in millions of likes. (And follow PAPER on TikTok).

Related | PAPER People 2020: Meet 20 TikTokers We Love

Picture your high school class clown, except actually funny and also really, really internet famous. That’s Mark Gaetano, AKA @snarkymarky. The 18-year-old Toronto native has perfected the art of imitating both teachers and students in his POV clips. He’s also made significant and hilarious contributions to the ongoing Karen discourse, inspired by his experiences working at a grocery store and serving shitty customers. A study hall legend.

@papermagazine

Introducing our class of 2020 PAPER People exclusively on TikTok💕 now go apologize to @snarkymarky for eating during class🤬

♬ original sound – papermagazine

Which TV shows are helping you survive 2020 and why?

Big Brother is getting me through 2020! Big Brother is a live show with live feeds that you can watch 24/7. I watch them almost every day or whenever I’m bored. It definitely keeps me entertained! Outer Banks was also great too!

What was your last text?

“That’s my new!” sent to my mom, because she found my new debit card in her car. I got it two days ago. I got a new one because I lost my old one. Here we go again!

What’s something no one knows about you but you wish people did?

I actually hate being the center of attention and I am nothing like I am in my videos. People are scared of me because I scream and yell in my videos. I promise, I’m not like that! I’d consider myself to be an ambivert!

What was the last song you listened to?

“Club” by Kelsea Ballerini. I love her so much.

Where do you want to be five years from now?

I would love to get into acting, or be a correspondent on a talk show. But if my online career doesn’t last as long as that, I would love a job at the United Nations. I’m a freshman in college and I’m studying international relations! I’ve always loved learning about the world, and different cultures, so I’d love a career in that field!

In one word, how would you sum up the internet?

Out-Of-Control. If I use hyphens, that counts as one word, right?

What’s your next move if TikTok is banned?

TikTok getting banned would be… terrible. But, I would try shifting my platform onto YouTube and do some videos there. But Instagram Reels has been super amazing. It’s reached some new audiences, and I was recently just featured on it!

What is your most irrational fear?

I feel like someone is watching me at ALL times. I feel like there’s cameras and microphones picking up on my every move. It’s really strange. Maybe it’s all the Big Brother I’m watching that’s causing this fear.

What’s your go-to appetizer?

Nachos! Or mozzarella sticks. Anything cheesy!

Who was your childhood hero and why?

Hannah Montana/ Miley Cyrus. I always thought it was super cool how she was an “ordinary girl,” but had a secret side to her. She was an average high school student, but also a pop star. I wanted to be her so bad.

Creative direction: Agusta Yr (at No Agency New York)
Styling: Erika Golcher
Styling assistant: Macauley Deverin
Environments: Aspik Tears


PAPER People: @iconiccpinkk

For most of 2020, our world has been reduced to the experiences we have on our phones. And TikTokers have been leading the charge in creating viral entertainment that keeps us scrolling for hours and hours. So this year’s PAPER People shifts its focus exclusively to TikTok — the breakout app our President wanted to ban, that launched sleeper hits and massive pop careers, that ushered in an entirely new generation of influence. Meet our 20 favorites across comedy, fashion, social justice and more, who are owning their spaces and racking in millions of likes. (And follow PAPER on TikTok).

Related | PAPER People 2020: Meet the 20 TikTokers We Love

On her extremely popular channel, 22-year-old Munera Fahiye AKA @iconiccpinkk shows the many advantages to wearing a hijab: you can covertly wear AirPods during class, store extra stuff in it and use it as a prop to create seamless duet videos on TikTok. Whether she’s dancing to “Money Trees” or accidentally going out to lunch during Ramadan, Munera is a must follow. She also has an amazing singing voice, even if her sister thinks it sounds like a dying mosquito.

@papermagazine

Introducing our class of 2020 PAPER People exclusively on TikTok💥 say hello to our queen @iconiccpinkk 💕

♬ Excitement TRIPPIE REDD PARTYNEXTDOOR – jeanvictorm

What’s your favorite animal social media account to follow and why?

My favorite animal account is @thatlittlepuff on Tiktok. I really love the videos on there because it’s a little cute cat cooking stuff and I am obsessed with cats.

Describe the most recent photo or video on your phone.

It’s a picture of my baby brother on his birthday. He looks so happy I love him.

Where do you want to be when the world ends?

With my family eating popcorn and watching a movie.

What gives you hope in 2020?

I love seeing this generation fight for what’s right and we are using social media to demand the changes that should’ve happened a long time ago.

What was your first reaction after going viral?

It was exciting and scary at the same time. I was getting so many nice comments and it was heartwarming to see. A lot of people from my school started recognizing me from my videos and that was also really cool.

What was your last text?

It’s a text to my brother asking him to get me some taco bell.

In one word, how would you sum up the internet?

Wild.

If you could have a superpower what would it be and why?

The ability to fly. When I was a kid I would take random objects and turn them into wings because I always wanted to fly for some reason.

What’s your most overused word or phrase?

I feel like I say “it is what it is” a lot because if something happens that I have no control over I just let it go and forget about it.

Describe your best night in this quarantine.

It’s having fun with my sisters and playing video games.

Creative direction: Agusta Yr (at No Agency New York)
Styling: Erika Golcher
Styling assistant: Macauley Deverin

PAPER People: @ladyefron

For most of 2020, our world has been reduced to the experiences we have on our phones. And TikTokers have been leading the charge in creating viral entertainment that keeps us scrolling for hours and hours. So this year’s PAPER People shifts its focus exclusively to TikTok — the breakout app our President wanted to ban, that launched sleeper hits and massive pop careers, that ushered in an entirely new generation of influence. Meet our 20 favorites across comedy, fashion, social justice and more, who are owning their spaces and racking in millions of likes. (And follow PAPER on TikTok).

Related | PAPER People 2020: Meet the 20 TikTokers We Love

Gather around, because Brooke Averick AKA @ladyefron (yes, as in Zac Efron’s wannabe wife) is the master of storytime. Whether she’s narrating the incidentals of her daily life, recalling a deeply embarrassing (or it would be, to most people) middle school moment or straight up reading from her 2009 diary, you’ll want to hear literally everything the 24-year-old creator has to say. Her comic timing is impeccable, her sense of shame nonexistent and her messages to her haters unapologetic. Dig deep for the Bar Mitzvah content, it’s worth it.

@papermagazine

Introducing our class of 2020 PAPER People exclusively on TikTok💥 Tip your fedoras to @ladyefron 💕💕

♬ original sound – papermagazine

What’s your favorite animal social media account to follow and why?

Definitely @wolfgang2242. It’s run by a guy named Steve who exclusively adopts senior dogs (he also has a pig, chicken and turkey) and finally gives them their forever home. Follow at your own risk because every time one of the dogs dies I can’t get out of bed for a week.

What’s your go-to appetizer?

Chips and guac every time.

Describe the most recent photo or video on your phone.

The last photo on my phone is a screenshot from Google of Pauly D from Jersey Shore without hair gel.

Which TV shows are helping you survive 2020 and why?

New Girl and The Office. I’ve seen them each over 10 times all the way through, but they’re a huge source of comfort for me which is what we all need in 2020.

When was the last time you cried?

Honestly 10 minutes ago when my Chipotle was delivered and they forgot the guac.

If you could give $1,000,000 to any charity, what would it be and why?

I’d donate all the money to different teachers and schools. Having been a preschool teacher for two years, I know how hard teachers work and how little they get in return.

What’s your next move if TikTok is banned?

I’ll restart The Office and New Girl.

What was your first reaction after going viral?

I quit my job. Hindsight’s always 20/20.

What’s one thing you’d change about TikTok?

Not being able to edit captions after you post. 90% of my posts are riddled with typos.

What’s the worst zodiac sign?

I’ve never met a mentally stable Gemini. Let the records show that I’m a Gemini.

Creative direction: Agusta Yr (at No Agency New York)
Styling: Erika Golcher
Styling assistant: Macauley Deverin

PAPER People: @LaetitiaKy

For most of 2020, our world has been reduced to the experiences we have on our phones. And TikTokers have been leading the charge in creating viral entertainment that keeps us scrolling for hours and hours. So this year’s PAPER People shifts its focus exclusively to TikTok — the breakout app our President wanted to ban, that launched sleeper hits and massive pop careers, that ushered in an entirely new generation of influence. Meet our 20 favorites across comedy, fashion, social justice and more, who are owning their spaces and racking in millions of likes. (And follow PAPER on TikTok).

@papermagazine

Introducing our class of 2020 PAPER People exclusively on TikTok✨ Say hello to @laetitiaky 🔥

♬ kimset by xix – ir1miku

Working with her own locs as a sculptural medium, artist Laetitia Ky is the face of a veritable Black hair movement. Whether she’s commenting on anti-abortion laws by shaping her hair into fallopian tubes or giving in to TikTok fan pressure and creating Shrek-themed hair art (complete with Smashmouth backing track), this 24-year-old from the Ivory Coast quite literally wears the crown.

Which pop star do you most relate to and why?

Definitely Rihanna! I think I am one of her biggest fans. I relate to her firstly because of how she went from nothing to everything. Also, she is extremely polyvalent: She sings, she acts, she dances, she is a business woman and she is engaged in a lot of humanitarian causes. I also love the fact that she is true to herself. She doesn’t try to censor her voice when she expresses herself just to please others. She says what she has to say and stands by that, just like I would. I relate to so many aspects of her personality. She is the queen and I aspire to accomplish in life things on the same scale as what she accomplished.

What’s your go-to appetizer?

Cashew nuts. I am obsessed with cashew nuts.

Where do you want to be five years from now?

In five years I hope I would be described as a supermodel. I also hope I start my acting career — that is very important to my heart. For my art, I want to be represented by some art gallery and I also hope in five years I will do things I can’t even imagine I could do now. I love when life throws surprising things at me and I am ready to jump on every interesting opportunity that will come, even if it is not in my industry.

If you could have a superpower what would it be and why?

Power of persuasion! Someone with that power would have the biggest influence ever. I would surely convince some leader of this world to suppress all the oppressive laws toward women. I would end so many bad things happening right now.

If you could give $1,000,000 to any charity, what would it be and why?

I will give it to 28 Too Many. It is an association who fights against female genital mutilation (FGM) in Africa! I think FGM is an extremely inhuman practice that needs to be eradicated.

What’s your next move if TikTok is banned?

Just continue to post on other social media. I am actually working on some project that will help me to move my presence from social media to a more physical place. Social media is amazing, but i don’t want to be dependent on it.

What’s one thing you’d change about TikTok?

Maybe fix the robot who deletes videos that violate the community guideline. More than 10 videos of me just doing my hair were deleted for no reason and it can be hard sometimes to see your long work being deleted like that.

What’s the worst zodiac sign?

Libra 😂😂😂😂

Where do you want to be when the world ends?

The place doesn’t matter as long as I am with my mom and little sister.

Who’s your TikTok crush?

Myself! “If you don’t love yourself how the hell are you gonna love somebody else? Can I have an AMEN up in here?” More seriously: I just have too many TikTok crushes to choose one.

What was the last song you listened to?

“Joro” from WizKid.

Creative direction: Agusta Yr (at No Agency New York)

Styling: Erika Golcher

Styling assistant: Macauley Deverin

PAPER People: @thereal_tati

For most of 2020, our world has been reduced to the experiences we have on our phones. And TikTokers have been leading the charge in creating viral entertainment that keeps us scrolling for hours and hours. So this year’s PAPER People shifts its focus exclusively to TikTok — the breakout app our President wanted to ban, that launched sleeper hits and massive pop careers, that ushered in an entirely new generation of influence. Meet our 20 favorites across comedy, fashion, social justice and more, who are owning their spaces and racking in millions of likes. (And follow PAPER on TikTok).

@papermagazine

Introducing our class of 2020 PAPER People exclusively on TikTok✨ Bow down to @thereal_tati 😤

♬ STAN LIZ SANCHEZ 4 CLEAR SKIN RNNNNN – officiallizsanchez

Tati Tots, assemble! Tatayanna Mitchell, AKA @thereal_tati, is here. One half of TikTok’s most shipped couple, bonnet-wearing master of the duet and food influencer during her downtime, the 21-year-old from Michigan is an essential follow for her prolific comedic posts. We still don’t know what happened with her rumored boyfriend Devin, but will keep you updated. In the meantime, let’s watch her hang out with another fav, @snarkymarky.

What’s your go-to appetizer?

Honey BBQ boneless wings with ranch.

When was the last time you cried?

I cry all that time [laughs] whether it’s an emotional cry, happy cry, or me crying from laughing.

What’s the most overused phrase or word?

“It’s the *blank* for me” and “Chile” [laughs] I say both, everyone wears those sayings out.

What was the last song you listened to?

“Excitement” by Trippie Redd and PARTYNEXTDOOR.

What was your first reaction after going viral?

I was extremely excited and overwhelmed because I didn’t know what was next.

What’s the worst zodiac sign?

Although I’m not into astrology that much, I’ll have to say Gemini because of the personal experiences I’ve had with them.

Where do you want to be five years from now?

I want to be happy in my lovely home, owning three businesses and be able to bless my parents with a home.

What’s your next move if TikTok is banned?

I will move my platform to YouTube and grow my channel just how I grew my TikTok — maybe not as fast, but I will get there.

One word to describe the internet?

Powerful.

If you could describe the headline of your profile, what would it be?

“I just want to spend the rest of my life laughing.”

Creative direction: Agusta Yr (at No Agency New York)
Styling: Erika Golcher
Styling assistant: Macauley Deverin

Tana Mongeau Faces Backlash For ‘Robotic’ Apology Video

Tana Mongeau is coming under fire for her latest apology video.

Last Friday, the controversial YouTuber uploaded a new vlog called “a long overdue apology,” in which she talked about the many mistakes she’s made and her prior lack of accountability.

Related | Tana Mongeau Responds to Racial Slur Accusations

“I want to apologize from the bottom of my heart for being such a big part of cancel culture for the entirety of my career,” Mongeau said. “I don’t deserve a platform if I continue to act in such a gas-lighting and irresponsible manner, and I’m so sorry for how long I’ve done that.”

She then went on to “express my utter disgust with every single apology video I ever made,” before apologizing and vowing to not return to YouTube until she becomes “someone that can shape youth in far better ways.” Additionally, Mongeau specifically apologized for recently attending a party against social distancing guidelines, as well as accusations of racist microaggressions leveled at her by YouTubers Kahlen Barry and SimplyNessa.

“There is no excuse for the amount of time it took me,” she said, later adding that she plans to donate to the NAACP, Feeding America and Pandemic Of Love.

“But I was so stuck in my narcissistic, egotistical ways that I was convinced I was a good person and I had nothing to learn.”

However, as Metro UK reports, Mongeau’s video apparently isn’t going over well with commenters, many of whom have accused the star of being disingenuous and reading off of a script.

“This sounds so robotic, it’s clearly been written these are not her words, alongside this there are SO many cuts in this too, you can tell it’s not sincere,” as one person wrote. Meanwhile, others pointed out that, ‘”I’m sorry if you feel like I hurt you” is not an apology btw.'”

“It feels like ….. you just don’t even care? What is wrong with you?,” another commenter added.

In the wake of the backlash, Mongeau reportedly addressed the criticism in her Instagram Stories by saying that the video wasn’t scripted.

“I just want to let you know that I am taking in everything everyone is saying, and will be making a response,” she said. “A lot of people are really coming for me for being so emotionless and just kind of talking, saying it’s a script or whatever, but I was just scared to cry. At the end of the day, if you’re crying, if you’re freaking out in an apology video, people are going to be so much more angry for that.”

Watch Mongeau’s apology video for yourself, below.

Photo via Getty

#MilkTeaAlliance Calls for a ‘Mulan’ Boycott

Since last summer, pro-Hong Kong democracy activists have already been calling for the boycott of Disney’s Mulan live action remake. This was after lead actress Liu Yifei made pro-Hong Kong police comments during an interview. And now that the film has premiered in multiple countries including the U.S., more Asian activists are using the hashtag #milkteaalliance to call for people to once again boycott the film.

Last year, people showed that Liu reposted a comment from government-run People’s Daily newspaper on Wribo, and wrote in Chinese, “I also support Hong Kong police. You can beat me up now.” She also said, “What a shame for Hong Kong,” and added the hashtag #IAlsoSupportTheHongKongPolice.

Chinese actress Liu Yifei, star of upcoming Disney blockbuster Mulan, shows support for Hong Kong police on Weibo,… https://t.co/MCPwBHhlfm — Vivienne Chow (@Vivienne Chow)1565880042.0

Related | ‘Mulan’ Star’s Pro-Hong Kong Police Post Sparks Boycott

Critics denounced this, saying that the actress was supporting police brutality. She hasn’t directly responded to these criticisms, but in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter earlier this year. she said, “It would really be a loss for me if I let the pressure overtake my possibilities … I think it’s obviously a very complicated situation and I’m not an expert. I just really hope this gets resolved soon … I think it’s just a very sensitive situation.”

As the film rolls out in Thailand, #milkteaalliance began to trend online. The hashtag signifies the shared love for milk tea or bubble tea in Thailand, Taiwan, and Hong Kong, which is where the majority of protesters voicing their support for the boycott are coming from.

#Milkteaalliance was first used when some Chinese nationalists online were attacking a Thai celebrity who allegedly expressed Hong Kong and Taiwan’s independence.

Photo via Getty

George Washington University Professor Pretended to be Black for Years

Years after Rachel Dolezal made headlines, a university professor has come out and admitted that she’s been pretending to be Black for years.

Jessica Krug, an associate professor at George Washington University — whose areas of expertise are Africa, Latin America and African American history — wrote a confession on Medium entitled “The Truth, and the Anti-Black Violence of My Lies.” She wrote, “To an escalating degree over my adult life, I have eschewed my lived experience as a white Jewish child in suburban Kansas City under various assumed identities within a Blackness that I had no right to claim: first North African Blackness, then US rooted Blackness, then Caribbean rooted Bronx Blackness.”

Related | Rihanna Says Rachel Dolezal is “a Bit of a Hero”

In the post, she mentioned that her mental health might be a factor in her actions throughout her adult life. “But mental health issues can never, will never, neither explain nor justify, neither condone nor excuse, that, in spite of knowing and regularly critiquing any and every non-Black person who appropriates from Black people, my false identity was crafted entirely from the fabric of Black lives,” she continued. “That I claimed belonging with living people and ancestors to whom and for whom my being is always a threat at best and a death sentence at worst.”

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“I have lived this lie, fully, completely, with no exit plan or strategy,” she wrote. “I have built only this life, a life within which I have operated with a radical sense of ethics, of right and wrong, and with rage, rooted in Black power, an ideology which every person should support, but to which I have no possible claim as my own.”

She ended her post, saying, “There is no way for me to satisfactorily end this statement. This isn’t a confession, it isn’t a public relations move, and it damn sure isn’t a shield. It is the truth, though.”

Krug has since been suspended by the school. And students and staff members who have been affected by her actions have been offered counseling. “We want to acknowledge the pain this situation has caused for many in our community and recognize that many students, faculty, staff and alumni are hurting,” authorities from Gearge Washington U said. “Please know that we are taking this situation seriously and are here to support our community.”

Photo via Getty

Livestream This: A. G. Cook’s Appleville

Thanks to Ms. Rona, we’re all trapped at home with nothing to do. Even Netflix is getting boring! But never fear. While they’re technically out of work, our favorite entertainers are still out here bravely making virtual content in a scary new world. Going to the club or the theater is out of the question right now (self isolate! Ariana Grande says so) but here’s PAPER’s ongoing guide to the latest livestreams — featuring comedians, actors, musicians and more.

Who? Ahead of the release of his second debut album, Apple, artist, producer and PC Music label head, A. G. Cook, is putting together a virtual livestream event featuring performances from Charli XCX, 100 gecs, Clairo, Amnesia Scanner, Jimmy Edgar, Dorian Electra, Hannah Diamond, Kero Kero Bonito and more. The concert will also feature the winner of Cook’s Appleguild Battle of the Band competition currently being held on discord.

When? It all goes down September 12 and is free to watch but fans will have the option to purchase a Golden Ticket through Bandcamp that will grant them access to the mosh pit, select recordings of concert and exclusive bonus music including a bagpipe-heavy remix of “Oh Yeah” by Caroline Polachek. All proceeds from Golden Ticket sales will go to Mermaids and the Black Cultural Archives.

Appleville 🍏 September 12th 💚 Livestream curated by @agcook404 🍏 Free to watch, but get a Golden Ticket to access m… https://t.co/XMu0ZWvoMD — PC Music (@PC Music)1599148891.0

Related | Every Track on A. G. Cook’s ‘7G’ in Seven Words or Less

Why Watch? Fresh off the release of a monster 49-track album, A. G. Cook has wasted no time in dropping yet another debut album on us with the highly anticipated, Apple. Having previously shared the stripped back singer-songwriter single, “Oh Yeah,” off the forthcoming effort Cook has paired the announcement with the maximalist hyper-EDM Trap followup “Xxoplex” proving once again that one of the past decade’s most influential producers still has what it takes to keep us on our toes.

From Pop Cube to Pop City, PC Music has had a history of putting together ultra-polished live shows that pull out all the stops and even though it may be a livestream, Appleville is no exception. Not only does the show boast an impressive lineup of Cook’s usual circle of friends and collaborators, but you can bet that everyone will be bringing slick visuals and surprises to the mix too. Cook describes the show as “a tribute to live computer music in all its forms. A pastoral escape in the comfort of your own home, an infinite green field where you can sit back and watch some of your favorite musicians grapple with the limitations of time and space.”

Photo Courtesy of A. G. Cook/ PC Music

Performing For a Virtual Audience Isn’t Easy

Lollapalooza co-founder Marc Geiger has predicted that live concerts as we know them won’t be back until 2022 because of the coronavirus pandemic and its fallout. It’s simply not safe to gather in large groups, unless you’re doing a drive-in concert, and the music industry has been working desperately to figure out the best way to cope with this undeniable fact. Virtual shows have become a makeshift replacement for in-person shows thanks to companies like MelodyVR, which has worked with artists like Kesha and Khalid, and Live Nation, whose latest concerts center around Megan Thee Stallion and Lil Uzi Vert. They’re the evolution of all those slightly janky Instagram Live performances that were important during the beginning of the pandemic.

With this new virtual frontier becoming the regular, fans are getting used to seeing artists come aboard, perhaps assuming that performing for a digital audience is similar to performing for a real-life one. But speaking with artists shows that the process of putting on a virtual concert is a lot different, for better and for worse.

Related | 17 People in Music Tell Us How the Industry Is Coping

In April, R&B legends Teddy Riley and Babyface faced off in an epic Verzuz battle on Instagram Live. It was a massive moment for virtual performances that became a hilarious highlight of the new era, thanks to a slew of technical difficulties that made the show start later than usual. Talk about epic. The jokes about them being uncles “using technology for the first time” made their performance much different than what it initially was pegged to be. While it worked in favor of these two particular artists, with their performed songs receiving a 115% increase in streaming following the battle, these kinds of technical issues can cause a headache for others getting into the digital space for the first time.

Musical sensation DDG, who’s signed to Epic Records and plans on performing virtually very soon, says that he prefers live shows so that he can engage with fans, revealing that the “technical components” of these performances have surprised him. “I think we’ve realized that these kinds of shows definitely require some amazing wifi connections.”

But even though he hasn’t put on a digital show yet, that doesn’t mean he hasn’t been working to connect with fans. “There’s definitely pressure to put on a show, but I’m releasing new music that’s rolling out left and right,” he says. “I’ve been working to drop music videos more frequently to keep my fans entertained.”

Related | Is Travis Scott’s Fortnite Festival the Future?

Virtual shows carry another difference that performers are taking note of:; that feeling of being alone, since the room isn’t filled with screaming fans. “We literally went from full-on engaging with crowds to looking at the air and performing to camera men — it’s definitely weird,” says Lyrica Anderson, a singer who’s co-written for Beyoncé and worked with both Timbaland and Jennifer Lopez, and recently released her fourth studio album, Bad Hair Day. “At a live show, you can always feel the energy of the crowd, and the love you need from them is always nice to get you hype on stage.With virtual shows, you’re performing to the people recording, where they are usually far away and it’s definitely not the same.”

Anderson, who’s performing a live virtual concert on September 18, can’t wait to get back to physical shows.”Not seeing people literally makes me sad,” she says. “The people that you’re performing for give you life and energy.” But even though she’s anxious to play for real people, she’s not in a rush to do so with the pandemic in full swing. “It’s way too risky to perform in person right now, so I’ll settle for this,” she says.

Rock band Portugal. The Man, currently performing for Tito’s Made To Order virtual festival that occurs until October 8, aren’t as opposed to the virtual shows as other artists. “It’s not as different as you might think,” says band member Eric Howk. “We just try to be ourselves on stage, so doing it on camera versus doing it before a crowd feels roughly the same. We do miss the big, loud audiences, but being able to play in such a beautiful spot feels just as spectacular as a sold-out arena.”

Related | The Vast Emptiness of the Virtual VMAs Red Carpet

Don’t get it twisted though — it’s still nerve-racking doing a virtual show, but Portugal. The Man don’t see that as a new thing. . “Every show is equally terrifying,” says Howk. “If it isn’t, you’re not doing it right.” There is a clear difference in the two performance types that causes them the most stress. “In a real show with a big crowd, it’s harder to hear the accidents,” says Howk.

Regardless of whether it’s a show in front of a screen or facing real people, what doesn’t change is the onset of nerves that musicians get. This is something that Anderson can attest to personally as she prepares for her virtual concert. “Performance anxiety happens regardless if you’re performing for one person or 1,000,” she says. “Everyone gets nervous, no matter how long you’ve been doing this/ Butterflies are always going to kick in before hitting the stage, but, once you’re there, your natural instincts just takeover.

Photo via Freepik

TikTok Star Bryce Hall Accused of Assaulting Two Minors

Though Bryce Hall is already facing potential jail time for throwing house parties against social distancing guidelines, according to another influencer, he could also be in even more legal trouble for an unrelated incident.

This past weekend, former Vine star and YouTuber Taylor Caniff claimed that Hall has “got a couple of lawsuits definitely coming his way” after an alleged assault against two minors.

Related | Bryce Hall, Blake Gray Face Criminal Charges Over Pandemic Parties

“We’re cool now, but obviously, the kid’s gotta watch what he’s doing,” Caniff told the paparazzi during an impromptu video interview.

“[He was] punching some little kids in the face and shit,” Caniff continued to allege. “I can’t say the kid’s name, but it’s gonna be out there. He punched a very young kid with a very wealthy family in the face.”

Hall has yet to respond to the accusations. In the meantime though, you can watch Caniff’s interview, below.

Photo via Getty

Addison Rae Is a SKIMS Model

2020 might be a landmark year for all the wrong reasons, but for SKIMS, there’s at least one reason to celebrate as this month marks the one-year anniversary of Kim Kardashian-West‘s shapewear line.

Kim — as well as the rest of the Kardashian-Jenner Klan — was essentially the world’s first real influencer. As such, her campaign stars one of the biggest right now: TikTok powerhouse and dance queen Addison Rae.

Related | Break the Internet: Kim Kardashian

In the campaign, Rae wears a sultry black bra and shorts set — likely an homage to the SKIMS founders’ recent minimalist aesthetic — inside a bedroom plastered with wall-to-wall KKW posters. In the accompanying video, she dons a brown bodysuit and stretches — possibly prepping for a new dance video? — in the same room, atop a bedspread and pillows printed with Kim’s face.

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New York — tag us if you see us! Billboards featuring three of our biggest supporters and customers – @brandivonne, @lala, and @addisonraee are scattered across the city to celebrate our 1 year anniversary on September 10! Join us everyday until then as we continue to showcase SKIMS customers and supporters worldwide.

A post shared by SKIMS (@skims) on Sep 1, 2020 at 11:02am PDT

It’s a mature new look for Rae, who’s become close with Kardashian’s sister Kourtney and was recently listed as the highest-earning TikTok star—no oversized sweatshirts or athleisure in sight. Having emerged as one of the app’s most famous stars, Rae’s Internet stardom is sure to bring her future success. Whether she’ll be in the next season of Keeping Up With the Kardashians, though, is TBD.

In addition to KKW and Rae fronting the campaign are digital influencers and celebrities Amelia Gray and Delilah Belle Hamlin, Jodie Turner-Smith, Lala Anthony, Precious Lee, Rumer Willis, and Yovanna Ventura.

Related | Poosh Calling: Kourtney Kardashian Takes Time Out for Herself

Kardashian-West founded SKIMS — which encompasses sizes XXS-4X, 31 cups, and 9 nudes — on the basis of enhancing the wearers’ natural shape, and the campaign is a testament to her followers’ support of the line. Based on her own famous curves and the constant focus on her body by the public at-large, SKIMS has been a success since its first drop literally sold out in minutes.

Though KKW gifted her popular Solutionwear to 100 customers, she’s also made the campaign as a thank you to her fans. That’s why, apart from Rae and the celeb set, eight customers also star in their own One Year Anniversary videos.







“I’ve loved seeing everyone’s photos in SKIMS and reading the comments on social media, and I wanted to use this time, the campaign, and customer gifting to really say thank you,” Kardashian-West said in a statement. “The customers are our inspiration for developing new ideas and collections and there is so much more to come.”

Aside from the focus on today’s digital stars and SKIMS customers, the Vanessa Beecroft-shot campaign highlights a range of body types and races in a giant bed surrounded by SKIMS dolls and walls covered KKW posters. What comes next is anyone’s guess — but we’re keeping our Instagram notifications on to find out. Happy first birthday, SKIMS!

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Click here to check out SKIMS’ shapewear and the full campaign.

Photos courtesy of SKIMS/ Vanessa Beecroft

Chadwick Boseman’s Final Post Becomes Most Liked Tweet Ever

Even in death, Chadwick Boseman’s legacy lives on through the memories of friends and family, the incredible work he’s done and the lives of those he’s touched. And one of the testaments to just how powerful his impact was to the world is the fact that his last tweet, announcing his death, has become the most liked post in Twitter history.

Related | Celebrities Pay Tribute to Chadwick Boseman

The tragedy of his death has affected so many, that the tweet has since received over 7 million likes, over 2 million retweets, and over 920,000 quote tweets as of Saturday afternoon. “Most liked Tweet ever. A tribute fit for a King. #WakandaForever,” Twitter’s official account said in a retweet of the post.

Most liked Tweet ever.

A tribute fit for a King. #WakandaForever https://t.co/lpyzmnIVoP

— Twitter (@Twitter) August 29, 2020

The record was previously held by former president Barack Obama, who tweeted back in 2017 after the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. “No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion,” he wrote, quoting Nelson Mandela.

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion…” pic.twitter.com/InZ58zkoAm

— Barack Obama (@BarackObama) August 13, 2017

Photo courtesy of Owen Kolasinski/BFA.com



Bella Thorne Apologizes for Hurting Sex Workers on OnlyFans

Last week, Bella Thorne basically broke OnlyFans when she made $1 million within the span of 24 hours. But controversy quickly arose after many accused her of “scamming” people by allegedly charging $200 for pay-per-view nude content, though she tweeted she wasn’t actually doing nudity.

Because of this whole stunt, other OnlyFans content creators are saying that the platform put a cap on how much they can charge for pay-per-view content. They say that because tons of subscribers are requesting refunds for Thorne’s non-nude “nudes,” the website has extended their cash-out period from 7 to 30 days.

Related | Bella Thorne’s OnlyFans ‘Scam’ Is Allegedly Affecting Sex Workers’ Pay

Now, Thorne has responded to these accusations. “I wanted to bring attention to the site, the more people on the site the more likely of a chance to normalize the stigmas, And in trying to do this I hurt you,” she wrote on Twitter. “I have risked my career a few times to remove the stigma behind sex work, porn, and the natural hatred people spew behind anything sex related. I wrote and directed a porn against the high brows of my peers and managers because I WANTED to help with the stigma behind sex.”

She continued, “I am a mainstream face and when you have a voice, a platform, you try to use you in helping others and advocate for something bigger than yourself. Again in this process I hurt you and for that I’m truly sorry. Ps. I’m meeting with only fans about the new restrictions to find out why!!! This is fucked up and I’m sorry comment any ideas or concerns you want brought up to OF!! and send me your links and a pic so I can promote you guys.”

PT1 Remove the stigma behind sex, sex work, and the negativity that surrounds the word SEX itself by bringing a mainstream face to it that’s what I was trying to do, to help bring more faces to the site to create more revenue for content creators on the site.

— BITCHIMBELLATHORNE (@bellathorne) August 29, 2020

I wanted to bring attention to the site, the more people on the site the more likely of a chance to normalize the stigmas, And in trying to do this I hurt you. I have risked my career a few times to remove the stigma behind sex work, porn, and the natural hatred people spew…

— BITCHIMBELLATHORNE (@bellathorne) August 29, 2020

behind anything sex related. I wrote and directed a porn against the high brows of my peers and managers because I WANTED to help with the stigma behind sex.

— BITCHIMBELLATHORNE (@bellathorne) August 29, 2020

…I am a mainstream face and when you have a voice, a platform, you try to use you in helping others and advocate for something bigger than yourself. Again in this process I hurt you and for that I’m truly sorry.

— BITCHIMBELLATHORNE (@bellathorne) August 29, 2020

Ps. I’m meeting with only fans about the new restrictions to find out why!!! This is fucked up and I’m sorry comment any ideas or concerns you want brought up to OF!! and send me your links and a pic so I can promote you guys

— BITCHIMBELLATHORNE (@bellathorne) August 29, 2020

In a statement provided to PAPER, OnlyFans said their new transaction limits were put in place to “to help prevent overspending and to allow our users to continue to use the site safely. We value all of the feedback received since this change was implemented and we will continue to review these limits.

Our objective remains to provide the best platform possible for the OnlyFans community.

We can confirm that any changes to transaction limits are not based on any one user.”

Photo via Getty

Jeffree Star Responds to ‘Homewrecker’ Claims Over His New Boyfriend

Jeffree Star is refuting the rumor that he broke up his boyfriend‘s past relationship.

Earlier this month, Star got tongues wagging after teasing the identity of his new beau, who internet users quickly deduced was none other than basketball player Andre Marhold. However, in the wake of this revelation, it also didn’t take long for Marhold’s alleged ex-girlfriend and the mother of his child to come forward in the comments and ask him to give her a “call to explain all of this,” as reported by The Blast.

Related | Jeffree Star Addresses Claims He Pays His Boyfriend to Date Him

“Prayer can’t get me thru this. I need you. the petty arguments drove you away,” she continued, per screenshots of her Instagram Story. “I always feared this day would come but not while our son was still in diapers, I will not let you down if you come home. Just be here when we wake up. Please! I can’t sleep without you please baby. I am literally going crazy.”

And while Star already addressed the rumor that he paid Marhold to date him for “PR damage control,” the beauty vlogger returned to Twitter on Friday morning to finally respond to all of the “homewrecker” accusations.

“I don’t hang out with married men. I’m not going to repeat myself again so read it twice Face throwing a kiss Marriage licenses are public record. Common sense is not so common,” Star wrote, before doubling down on his previous statement about not giving “money to anyone I’m dating or anyone who is fucking me.”

“Remember when I heard ‘he’s only with you for the money’ for 5 years with Nathan? I’m so bored of that rhetoric,” he said in reference to his ex of five years, Nathan Schwandt.

Not only that, but Star ended his tweet thread by shutting down those questioning Marhold’s sexual orientation, writing that, “the concept of being attracted to both genders, still REALLY has some people confused.”

See Star’s tweets for yourself, below.

I don’t hang out with married men. I’m not going to repeat myself again so read it twice 😘
Marriage licenses are public record.
Common sense is not so common.

— Jeffree Star (@JeffreeStar) August 28, 2020

Remember when I heard “he’s only with you for the money” for 5 years with Nathan? I’m so bored of that rhetoric 😴

— Jeffree Star (@JeffreeStar) August 28, 2020

The concept of being attracted to both genders, still REALLY has some people confused.

— Jeffree Star (@JeffreeStar) August 28, 2020

Photo via Getty



Bryce Hall, Blake Gray Face Criminal Charges Over Pandemic Parties

TikTok stars Bryce Hall and Blake Gray are now facing criminal charges for allegedly throwing giant house parties amid the pandemic.

On Friday, NBC reported that L.A. City Attorney Mike Feuer announced that charges had been filed against the Sway House members for hosting at least two large gatherings in their Hollywood Hills mansion against city social distancing orders. According to the report, both Hall and Gray face up to a year in jail and $2,000 in fines.

Related | TikTok Star Bryce Hall Has His Power Shut Off After Massive House Parties

“The hosts are incredibly irresponsible, with COVID-19 spreading and parties banned because of it. We’ve got to put a stop to it,” Feuer said in a statement. “If you have a combined 19-million followers on TikTok during this health crisis, you should be modeling good behavior — not brazenly violating the law and posting videos about it.”

This news comes on the heels of city mayor Eric Garcetti cutting off the power and water to Hall and Gray’s shared home last week.

“Despite several warnings, this house has turned into a nightclub in the hills, hosting large gatherings in flagrant violation of our public health orders,” Garcetti said at the time, echoing a previous announcement from health officials who warned hosting parties would become “a crime punishable by fine, imprisonment, or both.”

Hall and Gray have yet to comment.

Photos via Getty

Bella Thorne’s OnlyFans ‘Scam’ Is Allegedly Affecting Sex Workers’ Pay

Bella Thorne is under intense scrutiny from sex workers after her record-breaking OnlyFans reportedly resulted in a big change for the platform.

Earlier this week, Thorne made headlines for earning $2 million from the subscription-based adult site where she is charging $20/month for access to her feed as part of her “research” for a new film, according to her recent interview with the Los Angeles Times.

“It’s a feature we are researching as I’m living it currently,” Thorne said, before adding that she would be dividing the profits between charity donations and her production company. “What are the ins and outs? What does a platform like this do to its users? What’s the connective material between your life and your life inside the world of OnlyFans?”

Related | How Sex Workers Are Grappling With Coronavirus

That said, the real problem started once the former Disney Channel star allegedly began offering a $200 pay-per-view “nude,” which was subsequently dubbed a “scam” after Thorne tweeted she wasn’t actually doing nudity.

Granted, other OnlyFans creators are now saying that Thorne’s actions have led to a new cap on the site, which affects the amount they can charge for pay-per-view content and tips.

Not only that, but the site has also since extended the waiting period required for creators to cash out, from 7 to 30 days — something that allegedly stems from subscribers requesting refunds en-masse for Thorne’s non-nude “nudes.”

Hi fuck Bella Thorne pic.twitter.com/zKDa1DVb3g

— bea (@bbygrlbea) August 28, 2020

anyways yeah, fuck you, bella thorne. pic.twitter.com/dKjxUMUWR0

— Kira Noir Inc. (@thekiranoir) August 28, 2020

Here are the current places that have the 30 payout: pic.twitter.com/IIUzQ7ejeD

— Frailu (@Frailu_) August 28, 2020

In the wake of all this, actual sex workers — many of whom rely on the site for their livelihoods, especially amidst the pandemic — have taken to Twitter to express their anger over Thorne “ruining” everything through her “exploitation” and co-option of spaces “for the marginalized in the name of empowerment.”

It took 48 hours for Bella Thorne to ruin things for us OF creators/SWs because she felt like playing a pretend SWer. She scammed her subs and will never face the consequences of doing so (while the rest of us deal with it) among the general stigma of being in this field. pic.twitter.com/68MxUyQwKH

— neptuneexplainsitall (@urwaifuneptune) August 28, 2020

Bella Thorne;
– Hopped on OnlyFans with no intent on taking it seriously
– Made 2 milli in 48 hours
– Scammed her fans
– Ruined the platform for other creators
– Cause OF to cap pricing
– Financially impacted other creators
– Exploited the platform to make a movie… pic.twitter.com/VfyaeQt3hq

— MillennialLondoner (Claire) (@MillennialLDNer) August 28, 2020

I finally got caught up on Bella Thorne/ Only Fans, and a white Disney star and still *working* actress fucking up a platform that allowed sex workers to earn safely and with autonomy is basically THE snapshot of WW coopting spaces for the marginalized in the name of empowerment

— Naima Cochrane (@naima) August 28, 2020

“Bella Thorne really ruined a good thing for people who actually use onlyfans to make a living and pay bills,” as one Twitter user wrote. Meanwhile, another commenter accused her of “basically [destroying]” the site with “her lying.”

“Sex work is real work and Bella Thorne just made a joke out of it and proved she has no idea what it means to be a sex worker,” they continued. “She disrespected every sex worker out there and nobody will forget about this.”

Bella Thorne really ruined a good thing for people who actually use onlyfans to make a living and pay bills.

— Sahlt (@AlyciaTyre) August 28, 2020

The OnlyFans platform has basically been destroyed because of her lying. Sex work is real work and Bella Thorne just made a joke out of it and proved she has no idea what it means to be a sex worker. She disrespected every sex worker out there and nobody will forget about this.

— Sassafras (@hihohaihoe) August 28, 2020

That said, in a statement issued to The Wrap, OnlyFans said that their transaction limits were put in place “to help prevent overspending and to allow our users to continue to use the site safely,” though “any changes to transaction limits are not based on any one user.”

Thorne has yet to respond to the backlash.

Photo via Getty








Cookiee Kawaii Wants to Serve You a Giant Glass of ‘Club Soda’

If you were bored during quarantine, there’s a big chance you downloaded TikTok and tried to throw it back. And there’s an even bigger chance you were doing it to Cookiee Kawaii’s airy vocals asking, “If I back it up, is it fat enough?” “Vibe” has enjoyed lasting power on TikTok with its catchy, cheeky lyrics and, more recently, got an update as Tyga appeared on a remixed version, which came out earlier this month.

Related | PAPER x Club Quarantine: Exhale Fundraiser With Aaron Philip

Cookiee’s breakthrough happened in February 2020 when “Vibe” went viral on TikTok and racked up more than 50 million listens. But as she releases the second installment of her Club Soda series, the New Jersey native wants to prove she is much more than a fleeting phenomenon, and is here to give Jersey club music its due.

PAPER spoke to Cookiee to get the lowdown on the perks and downfalls of TikTok fame, the power of promoting yourself and why people need to stop sleeping on Jersey club.

How was the experience of “Vibe” going viral on TikTok while we were all stuck inside?

When I found out my song was going viral, I didn’t even have a TikTok account. My friend Legacy hit me up and she was like, “Hey, your song’s going viral on TikTok. You should check it out.” So I instantly made an account and at the time there were only about 2000 videos made. So I hopped right into promo and started letting people know like, “Hey, this is my song.” Now, about 2 million videos have been made, it’s crazy.

At first, I thought COVID was hurting my situation because I didn’t get to perform or do what normal people would do when their song goes viral. But it helped because the more we were locked down, the more videos people could make and the more creative they could get with their videos.

There’s definitely something to be said about TikTok’s power. Now, there’s talk of it getting banned. What do you think that means for artists whose songs blow up on the app?

TikTok can definitely help any artists boost their music if you do it the right way. Because even to this day, a lot of people don’t know “Vibe” is my song. I was actually getting bashed by people on TikTok just for commenting, “Hey, this is my song.” People would be like, “No, it’s not, this is so and so’s song,” because on TikTok if a person uses a sound, they would say they own it. So [TikTok] can help you if you get on top of promo, or else people will just use your song and not know who you are. They won’t tag you or give you the recognition.

One of my friends, FlyBoyFu, has a song, “Laffy Taffy” going viral on TikTok. And again, people don’t know it’s his song. So I basically told him to comment under every video. If you go on TikTok, you’ll see me under most of those videos saying, “Hey, thanks for using my song.” As far as TikTok getting banned, I would hope that it doesn’t get banned. It’s not just for music. Kids dominate TikTok. They love it. They make the craziest videos. If it did get banned, it’s still the same process: you have to promote yourself, no matter what app you’re on.

The fact that people don’t get proper recognition for their songs being played so much on TikTok is for sure a huge problem for artists.

Dancers make challenges, too. They’ll make a dance and it’ll go viral and everyone’s doing it. No one would know who made the dance. Once you start going viral, if you’re not like some huge influencer with a huge following, your credit can be overlooked. From my experience, you have to fight for your credit. If you do the math, I have almost 55 million streams on “Vibe” and there’s 2 million videos made on TikTok, but I only have like 147k followers on Instagram. That should let people know. It’s still an uphill battle, but it’s still a blessing. I wouldn’t trade it for anything. I don’t mind promoting myself. I’ve been doing it for years now.

Your “Vibe” remix recently came out with Tyga. That’s a great example using this phenomenon and building off of it. How did that come about for you two?

The managers reached out to me and said, “Hey, how would you feel if Tyga was to be in the video?” And I was like, “Hell yeah! Let’s do it.” He really was in tune with what I was doing with the Jersey club culture and he just wanted to be a part of it. From there, he sent over his verse and we just did it. It actually happened pretty fast. Who would say no to that? That’s a huge opportunity. I was shocked because when we shot the video, we were talking and he was just telling me that he actually listened to my other stuff, not just “Vibe.” It was a great time.

How would you say Jersey club differs from more mainstream club music?

You can’t mention Jersey club without mentioning the other genres. I feel like it thrives from Chicago house and it even comes from Baltimore club music. But what makes Jersey club different? I would definitely say our culture, like the whole Jersey club community. We have tons of dancers and tons of producers and tons of different vocalists or people that are actively pushing the genre. Cause again, you have Baltimore club, you have Chicago house, you even have Philly club music and Miami’s doing their own style of club music down there, as well. I feel like with Jersey, our whole Jersey club community is a little bit more active. I think that’s what separates us: the fact that Jersey club has been more consistent with putting out club music throughout the years.

How do both installments of the Club Soda project differentiate to you.

The first Club Soda is your first sip of my glass full of Jersey club bops that I’m going to give you. This second project, Club Soda, Vol. 2, is how you’re getting more buildup of this Club Soda. I had to give people a taste of what Jersey club was because Club Soda, Vol. 1 dropped before “Vibe” went viral. Vol. 2 is a reintroduction to the world of who I am and what Jersey club is. It’s that full glass of Club Soda to give you a taste of what we’re doing in Jersey in the club field. I’m excited.

It’s a weird thing to be dropping club music at a time where we can’t really go to the club. What ways are you trying to connect with fans right now?

I go live a lot. I recently did what I like to call the, #throwitbackathon, on my live because I hit 1 million views on the “Vibe” official video. I had everyone join the live. We were just dancing, having fun, listening to my music. Whether it’s Twitch, Instagram Live, Zoom, Discord, there’s all these new things that I didn’t know about until we went into quarantine. I’m finding so many different ways to engage and interact with followers online. So I go live a lot and I really engage with my fans online, whether it’s answering DMs. I have tons of them, but I try to answer randomly when I can. I’m just staying in tune with them online. I feel like it’s the best way, because we can’t go to the clubs. And I’ve been dying. I want to hear my songs played on club speakers. It’s a completely different experience. So you just got to turn people up at home. I plan on doing a #throwitbackathon maybe every week now, it was really lit.

What are you going to do the first time you can go to a club after all of this is hopefully over?

I’m going to run to the DJ booth and request that they play any of my songs. It doesn’t have to be “Vibe.” It could be any one of them. I would go to the clubs by myself sometimes just to hear music played that loud. It’s completely different from listening to headphones. I want to see people react to it. I really like that connection music can create between people. That’s one of the main reasons why I want to be a music artist. People don’t have to know you at all, but they listen to your song and it can start so many conversations. I love that.

Photos courtesy of Pierre York





This TikToker’s Extremely Long Thumb Keeps Going Viral

One TikToker‘s extremely long thumb has made him into a verifiable star.

Since last summer, multiple clips of Jacob Pina‘s appendage have gone viral, and the 21-year-old has continued to create videos about his extendable appendage ever since. But whether he’s showing off his thumb-wrestling skills or simply comparing it to a hot dog, his content is typically met with a mixture of collective horror and fascination — and if you watch one, you’ll see why.

Related | A Giant Baby Is Terrifying the Internet

According to BuzzFeed, while Pina’s right thumb is normally around two inches, he’s able to extend it up to 5.5 inches — something he learned he could do during his freshman year of high school.

“I just dislocated my thumb, by forcing it out of its socket, to make it appear longer,” he said, before adding that he never thought he’d get this kind of attention from it. “My doctor says it’s abnormal but can’t officially link it to any known medical conditions.”

That said, Pina went on to assure the publication that extending it has never hurt or caused him pain, and so you can be sure that he’ll continue to provide the internet with lots of thumb content. Just be forewarned: It makes quite the cracking noise.

See Pina’s thumb in action, here.

Photo via Getty

Left at London Writes ‘Perfect Songs About Imperfect People’

Back before TikTok was turning teenagers into social media stars and causing international controversy, there was once upon a time a little app called Vine. A gem of a social media platform with a life that was tragically cut way too short, Vine’s legacy still lives on in the generation of creators it fostered. Odds are if you’ve stumbled upon a “best of” Vine compilation at any point in the past couple of years you’re probably seen some of Nat Puff’s instructional clips on “How to Make a Frank Ocean Song.” But to pigeonhole her as just a Vine star would be selling Puff short.

A Seattle-based indie pop artist, poet and comedian, Puff’s work under her stage name Left at London is quickly, if not already, eclipsing her early internet fame with hits like “Revolution Lover,” “I DONT TRUST U ANYMORE,” and writing credits on Alice Longyu Gao’s “Dumb Bitch Juice.” As a songwriter, Puff wears her heart on her sleeve, tackling topics ranging from mental health to relationships to navigating today’s political climate as a queer person with a refreshing openness and honesty.

Related | Is This the End of Tiktok as We Know It?

Off the highly anticipated second volume of Transgender Street Legend, Puff is now back with her latest cut off the EP, “Safety First.” Thoroughly bedroom pop, with stylistic nods to mid-2000s indie rock like Beck and The Strokes seen through a more contemporary lo-fi lens, “Safety First” is ultimately a song about getting hurt. Lyrics like “I don’t know if I can love again/ But the crowds want a love song” run counter to a refrain of “I would like to kiss someone and cry,” relishing in the irrational set of contradictions that lost love puts us through. Puff is candid and emotionally raw with a bittersweet optimism that feels like seeing the sun poking out from behind the clouds after being thoroughly soaked in the rain.

Ahead of the PAPER premiere of “Safety First” off the upcoming EP Transgender Street Legend Volume 2, we caught up with Nat Puff to talk influences, comedy and the importance of prioritizing mental health.

How did “Safety First” originally come about?

“Safety First” was an interesting song to make because the beat for the first half came first, but I didn’t know what I wanted the song to be about. Originally it was much faster, and it was basically the opening riff to “Japanese Candy” by Little Teeth with a mid-2000s fast alt-rock feel. (Like Franz Ferdinand or something like that.) Didn’t like it, so I slowed it down and added a bunch of pitch and volume effects and the rest of the beat came from that. I posted it in a groupchat for members of the group FROMTHEHEART (which Vera and I are a part of) and Vera just made a verse for the intro. I really liked the idea of making the song about romantic love, but if it was any indication by my first single this year, “Blacknwhite,” I hadn’t been feeling all too optimistic about romance lately.

I wrote the chorus and believe I came up with the last two lines first, “I write for no one in particular/ I sing for someone I may never meet/ But I would like to smile again/ I would like to kiss somebody and cry.” I like the first part of the chorus is because of the contradiction; I can’t write for a particular person because I’m not in love with any particular person but the verses are very clearly about a particular person, they’re just not positive things. The second half was very much a fluke because the “I don’t have energy anymore” refrain was built as a different song about depressive tendencies. I didn’t like how it was sounding, so I scrapped it, went back to “Safety First,” and made some simplistic piano chords loosely based on the first half. Immediately I rewrote the “But I don’t have energy anymore” refrain to be specifically about putting energy into relationships and self improvement instead of literal physical energy. I rewrote the last two lines last minute to change the atmosphere of a self-pitying tone to an accusatory one, which I figured was a perfect representation of the lack of growth and self-improvement I felt like I hadn’t given myself enough of. It’s a perfect song for and about imperfect people. Not to toot my own horn, but like. Y’know. 🎺🎺🎺!!!

What do you hope comes across for people listening to the song?

It’s okay to be angry when you mourn as long as you also reflect on why specifically you’re angry. You find a lot about yourself when you question your motives.

What were some of the influences you were working with for this track?

“You Get What You Give” by New Radicals was a huge influence in the tone I wanted. I basically took the same vintage drum break feeling from “MARCH” by BROCKHAMPTON and applied it to my song. You can only find that song publicly on YouTube and stuff, but it was off of the bonus disc in the Saturation box set. Genuinely my favorite song by them. The fact that it’s essentially the emotional feeling of both combined was a huge influence in the emotions I had recording it. Not gonna lie, I don’t think I’ve been that involved during recording since “Blacknwhite.”

Are you optimistic about love in the time of corona?

Clearly I was not at the time of writing! BUT I have reasons to be optimistic now. It’s hard to be patient, but life rewards you when you are. That’s what I got to say about that.

How would you say your music’s evolved since Transgender Street Legend Vol. 1?

Drastically. For one thing, I’m now strictly bedroom pop on this EP (except for “6 Feet” which was written, recorded and produced in Dylan [Brady’s] studio in LA) TSLV1 was written and semi-produced in my bedroom except for the vocals for the first two songs which were recorded professionally in a studio. It took a while, but I finally set up my mic to sound good isolated and now I’m unSTOPPABLE !!!!!! But like genuinely, I feel like I’ve learned more about production in this pandemic than I ever have before in a concentrated span of time. I’m really proud of myself for that.

What was it like being a vine star, once upon a time?

It’s funny cause honestly I only had like three or four viral vines that got a resurgence in popularity after Vine died because they were featured in a lot of vine comps. I have like, 10 times the followers on TikTok now than I ever did on Vine. That being said, it was my first real taste of internet virality being attached to my face. Looking back it was weird. I was telling somebody that I had just met about the experience and the year I started to blow up. They responded “So you’ve been internet famous for your entire adult life?” I did the math, realized I blew up around age 18, and then realized how none of my adult life has been away from a spotlight. Shit was surreal to realize so many years after.

What sort of lessons did you take away from that experience?

The most important thing I’ve learned from myself and others is that fame in any form will stifle your sense of self, traumatize you in small ways, and stunt your emotional growth. I advocate for anyone to go to therapy, but especially content creators because they’re the type of motherfuckers to most likely refuse it despite having resources. People make assumptions that because somebody is popular on the internet that they’re rich and happy. Like yeah, I’m living my dream job, but it’s admittedly so different from how I imagined it. It can fuck with your ego in the sense that I’ve seen people go, “I have my dream job but I’m not happy… maybe I need to be better at my dream job.” It starts diverting into this really capitalist mindset that you need to get more money doing what you love in order to be happy, which is not true. I’ve met people at all levels of success and the common thread is that they’re thankful but hungry for more and let it eat away at them (including the particularly successful ones).

Therapy helps a lot, reminds me that I’m not disposable, that I’m a real person beyond my career. Makes the relationship with the fans stronger too because I have the ability to be happier and make better content. Even when I’m not happy, I feel more able to talk about it via music because of that. That’s why it’s important to focus on yourself and your community more than your career; art (whether its comedy, music, or whatever) is based on life experience. If your entire life experience is chasing fame, your art is gonna make you out of touch with what the modern everyman wants, because it lacks sincerity. A lot of people will hear that type of opinion and assume, “Oh so you’re talking about rap?” which, first of all, no, because I’m talking about all forms of art, not just music, and not just rap. Second of all, while rap definitely has its share of out of touch people, the narrative is usually either a “rags to riches” story, or a cautionary tale about being unsatisfied after blowing up and processing why. Sure, they’re balling, but they’re bawling too, y’know? It’s not a rap song but “Super Rich Kids” (by Frank Ocean) was a great song because it presented itself as a character study on the exact type of stifling of one’s emotional growth that fame can do, rather than a “I’m so rich, pity me” type view. It’s perfectly possible to make art about that phenomenon, you just have to know why you’re making it.

What informs your sense of humor? Your musical taste?

It’s like asking a chef what the right spice to put in every dish is; not only are most spices going to improve a meal (especially when combined), but different meals require different spices. Like it’s possible to put oregano in a pb&j, but you better know what you’re fucking doing. But I honestly just make whatever I’m in the mood for. Instead of seeking out a sound from another person for example, I make the song I want to hear. That’s kind of why my taste in music that I listen to is somewhat unorthodox for someone who’s writing style is very indie and pop, I know I can’t make that type of music at the level I’m currently at. Like I could try and make a Death Grips song for example, but it’s gonna sound insincere & tasteless. I’d rather just listen to the real thing. Humor’s the same. I make jokes I think are funny. Sometimes it’s parody, sometimes it’s wordplay, sometimes it’s surrealistic. But I honestly barely calculate what I’m going to say.

Photography: West Smith


Rickey Thompson and Denzel Dion Have a Podcast Coming

Rickey Thompson and Denzel Dion have inked yet another deal together. Spotify has announced that the two influencers, who’re best friends and budding fashion icons, have signed a deal for an exclusive podcast series to air weekly.

Ever since their Vine days, Thompson and Dion have amassed massive following with their unique sense of humor. Now, they’re all over Twitter, YouTube, TikTok and Instagram with brands that have evolved into worldwide spectacles. Their new conquest will see them exploring, according to a press release, “personal stories from their week, delish on pop culture, fashion & music and engage with fans by giving them advice.”

View this post on Instagram Good morning 🥳🤎
A post shared by DENZEL DION (@denzeldion) on Aug 27, 2020 at 7:37am PDT

This is an exciting deal for Thompson and Dion, and they’re both as ecstatic. “I am so excited to have partnered with Spotify on this podcast,” says Thompson in a statement. “My friend Denzel and I have always dreamed of having a podcast, and the fact it’s with Spotify is the cherry on top! I can’t wait to start this journey and I couldn’t be happier.”

Dion continues, “I’m so ecstatic to have Spotify as a partner for our podcast, it feels like family. Rickey and I are ready for this new adventure. I can’t wait for us to speak our unapologetic minds and, most importantly, have fun while doing it!”

Related | Introducing: Road Trippin’ With Rickey Thompson and Denzel Dion

In July, Thompson and Dion partnered with Snapchat for a hilarious docuseries, Road Trippin’. On each episode, the duo traveled across rural America for wild adventures inspired by Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie’s reality show, The Simple Life. From taking part in skydiving to feeding hungry alligators, Road Trippin’ was a wild experience.

In a July interview with PAPER, the dynamic duo hinted at their creative takeover. “This isn’t the last that you’ll see of us,” said Thompson. “We’re going to do way, way more in fashion, of course. We definitely want to step into acting.”

Photo via Instagram



Livestream This: MoMA PS1 Warm Up

Thanks to Ms. Rona, we’re all trapped at home with nothing to do. Even Netflix is getting boring! But never fear. While they’re technically out of work, our favorite entertainers are still out here bravely making virtual content in a scary new world. Going to the club or the theater is out of the question right now (self isolate! Ariana Grande says so) but here’s PAPER’s ongoing guide to the latest livestreams — featuring comedians, actors, musicians and more.

Who? MoMA PS1 is reviving their long-standing summer party series, Warm Up, to close out the summer with one last big bash. Boasting a lineup that draws on a wide cross-section of New York’s vibrant underground music community, the stream will feature sets from Eartheater, Papi Juice, AceMoMA, J.I., Sie7etr3, Stonie Blue, St. James Joy, Sazón Department, KeiyaA, Barbie Bertisch, Analog Soul and Disco Tehran.

When? The stream will be broadcast via Boiler Room from 12 PM – 8 PM EDT on September 5th, as well as several outdoor venues across Brooklyn and Queens.

Why Watch? A staple of New York’s summer party calendar, the long running Warm Up series’ absence this year due to the pandemic has been sorely missed. A perennial barometer for the coolest and most exciting acts on the rise with past past lineups having featured Cardi B at the height of “Bodak Yellow” summer, a pre-Cuz I Love You Lizzo, a surprise Skrillex alongside sets from artists like SOPHIE, Jacques Greene, DISCWOMAN and Amnesia Scanner to name a few.

And while you won’t be able to pack into PS1’s gravel-filled courtyard, Warm Up has partnered up with a variety of outdoor venues such as Elsewhere, The Rockaway Hotel, Queens Botanical Garden, 99 Scott, Cafe Erzullie, Public Records and more to provide an opportunity to safely get out of the house and support local businesses. MoMA PS1 and Red Bull will also be raising money for the NYC Nightlife Untied emergency relief fund throughout the stream with special up-cycled t-shirts designed by Willie Norris.

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Photo courtesy of Eartheater